Improving academic success: Evaluation of the BN Transition to Clinical Practice Module

S. Webster, T. Harding, J. Robinson, C. Yeboah, C. Hutchison, D. Mountain

Abstract


Objective: Bachelor of Nursing (BN) students are required to develop clinical knowledge, skills and attitudes for professional practice. The objectives of this project were to assess the challenges of adapting the Transition to Clinical Practice Module (TCPM) to the field of Nursing and to evaluate the impact of the TCPM on BN students’ confidence and knowledge for successful transition to clinical practice.

Method: This study was a pre-intervention/post-intervention assessment (pre-post) methodology using a questionnaire specifically designed to evaluate and determine how well the student’s performance improved after attending the TCPM. Qualitative comments from participants were used to further evaluate data and provide ‘richer’ results.

Results: There were three hundred and eighty (380) participants; eighty-two percent rated the program as better than expected, 16% rated it the same as expected and 2% less than expected. All said that in the pre-program they had expected more emphasis on areas of skills deficits in nursing, and post program 96% indicated that it had actually helped them to develop skills. Participants rated themselves as being more knowledgeable (P < .01) and confident (P < .01) post program in most areas except confidence with academic skills and accessing support services (P < .05). Internal consistency for the 14-item scale was 0.92 (confidence), 0.86 (self-concept), 0.84 (communication) and 0.94 (knowledge) pre-program, and post program the internal consistency was 0.93 (confidence), 0.84 (self-concept), 0.86 (communication) and 0.90 (knowledge).

Conclusion: This TCPM program can contribute positively to students’ transition to the academic and clinical demands of the BN. Therefore the TCPM is likely to positively influence a sense of value and identity within the nursing profession. It may ultimately lead to improved BN student retention rates.

 


Full Text: PDF DOI: 10.5430/jnep.v4n5p95

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Journal of Nursing Education and Practice

ISSN 1925-4040 (Print)   ISSN 1925-4059 (Online)

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